S1 - Preamble
S2 - Partnerships
S3 - Governance
S4 - Organizational Integrity
S5 - Finances
S6 - Fundrainsing & Communications to the Public
S7 - Management Practices & Human Ressources
S8 - Acheiving Compliance
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Summary
Fundrainsing & Communications to the Public
S 6.4
Raison d'être
Indicators of Compliance
Ethical Questions to ask
Examples of good ethical practice
Examples of poor practice
  1. The Organization shall ensure that images and text included in all communications to the public: 

          1. respect the dignity and rights of the individuals portrayed and their way of life;

          2. are accurate, balanced, truthful and representative of reality and do not generalize and mask the diversity of situations;

          3. portray local communities as active agents in their own development process and do not fuel prejudice or foster a sense of Northern superiority;

          4. encourage a sense of interconnectedness and interdependence between the Canadian public and the people shown in the image or discussed in the text.

Why
Why

This Standard addresses the important issue of interpreting the work with overseas partners through print or in visual images. It is premised on respect for the dignity and human rights of all people. 

 

This Standard underscores that communications to the public should promote greater understanding of global issues. Furthermore, communications to the public should honestly portray the role of Canadians, not only as potential participants in solutions but also as beneficiaries of historical and current injustices.

 

While fundraising is an important form of communication to the public, care must be taken to ensure that this activity does not undermine the broader aims of the CCIC community. The short-term goal of providing resources must serve the long-term objective of working toward sustainable human development and the strengthening of global civil society, global citizenship, and partnerships between equals. Effective fundraising does not trump effective development. 

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Indicators of Compliance
Indicators of Compliance
  • Southern partners approve of the messages conveyed by the Organization’s communications.
  • There is agreement within the Organization that the communications are appropriate.
  • Concerns raised about the Organization’s communications are promptly rectified.
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Ethical Questions to ask
Ethical Questions to ask
  • Have the program officers of the Organization been consulted about the fund-raising messages?
  • Have we consulted our Southern partners about how they, and the communities with which they work, are portrayed in the messages?
  • Does our annual evaluation process include a review of our previous year’s communication materials to ensure that our development messages are all ethically appropriate?
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Examples of good ethical practice
Examples of good ethical practice
  • Appealing on the basis of justice and a common humanity, rather than on the basis of guilt.
  • Presenting a message of potential change, portraying a balanced view of both the needs and the accomplishments of local communities.
  • Focusing on women as key players, not just as vulnerable or victimized people, and ensuring that their concerns, perspectives and experiences are included.
  • Ensuring that the voices of partners and local communities are heard directly, not through Canadians speaking for them.
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Examples of poor practice
Examples of poor practice
  • Creating a false impression that donors’ dollars alone will solve a problem, instead of encouraging donors to ask why there are such disparities in the world.
  • Portraying individuals as needy or helpless objects of charity, and/or using techniques such as camera angles which lead one to “look down on” the subject of the image.