S1 - Preamble
S2 - Partnerships
S3 - Governance
S4 - Organizational Integrity
S5 - Finances
S6 - Fundrainsing & Communications to the Public
S7 - Management Practices & Human Ressources
S8 - Acheiving Compliance
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Summary
Governance
S 3.6
Raison d'être
Indicators of Compliance
Ethical Questions to ask
Examples of good ethical practice
Examples of poor practice
Extraits audios
  1. The Organization shall have policies prohibiting discrimination and promoting gender equality and participation of disadvantaged groups at all levels of the Organization. This does not supersede the right of the Organization to self-define when it is done in compliance with the law.

Why
Why

This Standard addresses the ethical principles of human rights and fairness. Recognizing that systemic discrimination in organizations often reflects continued discriminatory structures in society, CCIC members agree to take positive actions to ensure that people’s rights are respected within their organizations, as well as at the social level. This Standard highlights the importance of having written policies, to demonstrate commitment to action and to provide consistent guidelines for people throughout the Organization. It reflects the understanding of CCIC members that equality is about power, and that an Organization must not only act to remove discriminatory barriers but must also take steps to promote access to decision-making and participation in its activities. It is not enough to declare a commitment to inclusion in a policy and just wait for it to happen.

 

Human rights codes in Canada include a limited exception to the general rule of non-discrimination by allowing certain organizations to “self-define”. The second sentence of the Standard acknowledges this legal right, recognizing that certain organizations exist, or carry out activities, in order to serve the interests of particular persons or groups.

 

 Because the objective of the CCIC Operational Standards is to go beyond the minimum expected by law, an Organization wishing to self-define must first explain to CCIC why any restrictions or preferences are genuine requirements for its purposes and programs. In other words, if the Organization is requesting an exemption from the first part of the ethical standard, its practice must still be in keeping with the ethical principles of human rights and fairness.

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Indicators of Compliance
Indicators of Compliance
  • The Organization has clear written policies prohibiting discrimination and promoting gender equality and participation of disadvantaged groups.
  • The policies address all organizational functions including membership, employment practices, provision of services, publications, and advertising.
  • The Organization is able to prove that any self-definition is a genuine requirement of its purposes and programs.
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Ethical Questions to ask
Ethical Questions to ask
  • If women or members of other disadvantaged groups are currently under-represented, particularly in our governing body and among senior staff, what is it about the way the Organization works that might encourage this exclusionary structure?
  • Are we justified in self-defining because we are trying to rectify an existing or historic discrimination, and are we doing it with respect for human rights and fairness?  
  • If we have a diverse staff, are differences evident in the way the Organization works as a result, or is everyone expected to conform to a norm that privileges certain individuals or groups?
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Examples of good ethical practice
Examples of good ethical practice
  • Designing recruitment processes for the governing body and senior staff that reach out to members of disadvantaged groups, including women.
  • Ensuring that meeting schedules and expense reimbursement policies are designed to enable participation of members of disadvantaged groups.
  • Consulting women and members of disadvantaged groups in the development of policies and programs.
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Examples of poor practice
Examples of poor practice
  • Not evaluating whether any progress is being made on policy goals.
  • Failing to monitor and take steps to internally reflect the changing demographics of Canadian communities.
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