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PRESIDENT'S CORNER

The Morning After: Canada and the new "Global Goals"

Julia SanchezSo, the much anticipated United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 is now behind us! World leaders have gathered last week-end in New York to formally adopt and celebrate a new development framework which will succeed the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).  Civil society was also present at the Summit, in unprecedented numbers, as were foundations, businesses and other stakeholders.

The outcome of a multi-year and multi-faceted negotiation process, “Transforming our world: the 2030 agenda for sustainable development”, or Agenda 2030 for short, presents a much more comprehensive and complex set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); one that aspires to tackle global development in a more comprehensive and durable way than the predecessor MDGs did.  By bringing together the traditional and often parallel streams of development and environment, defining international cooperation for development in much broader and holistic terms, and focusing on some key underlying causes of under-development (such as inequality), the table is set for countries to cooperate in significantly different and enhanced ways. This could lead to more coherent international relations for sustainable development, and result in important progress towards a more equitable, just and prosperous world over the next fifteen years.

As I participated in side events, listened in on interactive dialogue and plenary sessions, and held side conversations with a host of UN bureaucrats who have spearheaded the SDG process to date, I was left with one overarching question: will Canada engage meaningfully with this agenda? And, if it will or can, what has to happen for that engagement to be aspirational and inspirational? Furthermore, and more specifically, what is Canadian civil society’s role in achieving this?

And as I listened to representatives of the German, Swedish and Colombian governments, amongst others, describe how they were putting the new goals, and their many indicators, at the centre of a profound all-of-government policy review, I was painfully reminded of the steep climb that lies ahead for us in Canada as we engage with this agenda and the world in a more intentional and constructive way.

On this “morning after” moment, civil society is at a three way cross-roads; we can choose business as usual (BAU), we can choose to tweak BAU and pretty much continue on the path already started with the MDGs, or we can choose a totally new way forward which reflects the transformative potential of this agenda.

I believe that BAU is not an option – the world has moved on, the agenda has broadened and deepened, and the challenges before us today go beyond the aid world that we have come to know and work in. The nature of these shifts is so significant that tweaking our ways of working will not do the trick either. And I would argue that our sector risks irrelevance unless we take the third route and profoundly rethink and revamp the way we work in order to engage with this new agenda and make full use of the opportunities it presents, while guarding against the potential risks it encompasses.

My colleague Fraser Reilly-King has put forth while in NY last week that we must take the third route if we are to make any difference in the next 15 years. And that to do so successfully, we need to project ourselves 15 years ahead, to 2030, and have a clear vision of where we need to go, what we need to do, and who we need to work with to get there. This third path is “business unusual”, as coined by other colleagues at the summit.

For starters, we need to break out of the confines of “aid for development” and embrace the depth and breadth that the new agenda offers within a context of “international cooperation”. We need to better understand and engage with the universal nature of this agenda, deepening our engagement with Canadian domestic groups and issues, and further transform the dynamics between us in the north and our counterparts and partners in the south.

The implementation of Agenda 2030 presents many challenges, including the risk that it not go deep or wide enough to produce the truly transformative change that is so desperately needed.  However, it also presents an interesting opportunity for us to build all-of-civil society networks around key development challenges that we have always known we need to build, but never had the courage or global context to do it.
On this morning after, I am optimistic that we can use the new framework to talk to Canadians differently about development, work with others and in different ways on key issues that are central to Canada’s and the worlds progress, and challenge our governments, the UN, the private sector and ourselves to do more and better for a sustainable future. We can do better 2015!

In solidarity,

Julia
Twitter: @JSanchezCCIC

Do you have any reactions to this column? I’d like to hear from you! Please send any comments to Julia Sanchez.

NEW DEVELOPMENTS

We Can Do Better 2015 – Latest news

We Can Do Better 2015The response to our Elections Toolkit has been overwhelmingly positive! Drawing on the Toolkit’s questionnaire for candidates, CCIC has reached out to the leaders of the five main political partiesand asked them to respond to 10 questions to see where each party stands on issues that are central to the campaign (fighting poverty and inequality, promoting women’s rights, tacking climate change and universality). The results will be shared on October 17, International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. Not satisfied with waiting for their response until then, ahead of the Munk Debate on Canada’s Foreign Policy, CCIC organized a Thunderclap campaign to send one common message to the three debaters: How will Canada's leaders address global poverty, inequality & climate change through the new UN Global Goals? The participation was high –we met 200% of our target!-and although we were disappointed with having none of the leaders make reference to the Global Goals during the debate, the Thunderclap was still very useful to raise awareness about the Goals and engage in conversations.

Up For Debate interviews the leaders on women's issues

Up For DebateA year-long campaign to create a national conversation on women’s rights in the mainstream and social media and put women’s issues at the center of the 2015 federal election culminated in an exciting event in Toronto last week. A sold-out audience listened to exclusive interview footage with four of the five federal party leaders– discussing a variety of issues including sexual harassment, missing and murdered aboriginal women, employment and pay for women, child care and democratic representation, in addition to detailing their platform commitments on women’s rights. The event, in partnership with the Toronto Star and Le Devoir, was broadcast live on Periscope by Twitter Canada. Full interviews with the party leaders are now available here. Visit http://upfordebate.ca/ for all campaign information and news.

New organization to monitor multinationals and human rights

Above Ground was created to encourage multinational companies to respect human rights.At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record. At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record. At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record. At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.

     

Canada Off-Track on Human Rights

At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.

At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.

NEW MEMBERS

CCIC is thrilled to welcome the Centre for international coopertation in health and development (CCISD)!

CCISDThe Centre for international cooperation in health and development (CCISD), a Canadian not-for-profit corporation based in Quebec City, has been developing and managing international health projects since 1987. CCISD's mission is to help sustainably improve the health of populations by strengthening health sector resources and supporting the community groups that work with these resources. With a unique range of experience, knowledge, and competencies in the health sector, CCISD has developed significant expertise in areas such as primary health care with a strong emphasis on maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH), the prevention of STIs/HIV/AIDS, and epidemiological surveillance.

 

MEMBER PROFILE: Canada World Youth

CWYThis month, CCIC met with Canada World Youth President-CEO Rita S. Karakas, to talk about its new program EQWIP HUBs: Powering Sustainable Youth Livelihoods, why it is important for youth to play an active role in international development, what the SDGs mean for the organization, and what is behind Canada World Youth longevity which celebrates its 45th anniversary in 2016…among other things!

Canada World Youth recently launched a program called EQWIP HUBs: Powering Sustainable Youth Livelihoods. Can you tell us more about this program as well as your partnership with Youth Challenge International?

CWY is proud of its new program EQWIP HUBs: Powering Sustainable Youth Livelihoods. The project is powered by the strategic alliance of Canada World Youth and Youth Challenge International (YCI). As two of Canada’s foremost organizations focused on youth development, we bring 70+ years of youth engagement and transformational learning. This is a critical initiative on behalf of CWY and a highly valued relationship and we look forward going global.

A five-year initiative will look at the different elements that can have a positive influence on youth livelihoods, particularly young women. Through hubs located in urban and semi urban centres, the project will offer employability and entrepreneurship training that is responsive to local realities. At the same time, it will foster collaboration among local governments, the private sector and civil society to leverage local resources and create more opportunities for youth.

MEMBERS IN ACTION

Inter Pares Solidarity Tour, Guatemala 2016

At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.

Wildlife. Not Entertainers – World Animal Protection

At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.

 

WORTH A LOOK

Latest articles published in Development Unplugged ​

At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.At the end of July, the UN's Human Rights Committee - which monitors the implementation of civil and political rights by states at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – issued a critical report by 18 human rights experts on Canada's track record.

Imagine Canada Report: Charities in Canada as an Economic Sector

Imagine Canada's Chief Economist for Canada's Charitable and Nonprofit Sector released late June a discussion paper entitled Charities in Canada as an Economic Sector.

 

CCIC IN THE NEWS

The Future of Poverty |  Canadian Mennonite | July 22, 2015

Delays still plaguing internship program    | Embassy  | July 8, 2015

Canadian Neocolonialism in Colombia: Oil, Mining and the Military  | Earth First!  | July 4, 2015

The tragedy of Harper's Canada | Counter Punch | July 3, 2015

CCIC PRESENTS

Americas Policy Group Member Meeting
November 23-24, 2015
Location: Ottawa
For more information: Stacey Gomez

2016 CCIC Annual Conference
May 11-12, 2016
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
Save the date!

 

EVENTS

KAIROS Forum on Fracking
Vancouver & Moncton, Canada | October 30-31, 2015

Sécurité, action humanitaire et aide au développement : quels liens?
Montreal, Quebec | November 3, 2015

Match Up! Ottawa's First Feminist Human Library & Networking Event
Ottawa, Ontario | November 5, 2015

Journées québécoises de la solidarité internationale : Toutes ensemble
Across Quebec | November 5-14, 2015


If you have an item for Flash, send it by e-mail to Chantal Havard. Please note that Flash items should be no longer than one paragraph.

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